The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones

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One of the things that always fascinates me in stories (especially fantasy) is the food. Well, the same can be said of real life, but there is something to be said about how authors of fantasy books describe food. I suppose that given the immense amount of creativity necessary to come up with a successful fantasy book (not to mention series), one can only expect the description of the cuisine to be as detailed as possible.

Another great thing about food in fantasy stories is that you can actually make the dishes – or at least give it a try – in real life. Today. This is not a new concept. There are already people making a big deal out of feasting like hobbits.

The first episode of Game of Thrones may not have shown a lot of dishes that would make you slobber like an American shar-pei, but believe me, the entire (book) series is full of delectable dishes. Just hang in there and I am pretty sure we’ll get to see more food in the upcoming episodes.

In the meantime, you might want to check out this awesome blog called The Inn at the Crossroads. ((Inn at the Crossroads)) This is the blog of two women who are avid fans of George R.R. Martin and of, well, food. The inevitable has happened – food from the book series Song of Ice and Fire has become a reality, thanks to these two women.

The blog is relatively new but the gals have been busy in the kitchen, making medieval versions and modern versions of food from Westeros. The result? A load of photos and descriptions of dishes that will make your mouth water. Or not – depending on your preference in food. Medieval food, after all, is not something that appeals to everyone.

In case you are an ace in the kitchen, and you want to try something new (or old, depending on how you look at it), here are some of the tastier medieval dishes from the blog.

Let’s start with Winterfell, the setting for the first episode of the HBO series. This is what they typically have for breakfast. Description: “There was much more than she’d asked for: hot bread, butter and honey and blackberry preserves, a rasher of bacon and a soft-boiled egg, a wedge of cheese, a pot of mint tea. And with came Maester Luwin.” (I: 113)
Breakfast at Winterfell 470x626 The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones

Next up is a salad of green beans, onions, and beetroot. The ladies tried a medieval version and a modern version, the difference being that the broiling is employed in the latter, as opposed to boiling. Their choice: the modern version.
Salad of Green Beans Onions and Beets 470x352 The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones

This one’s for those who like fish – trout wrapped in bacon. They got me at bacon.
Trout in Bacon 470x352 The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones

The next three are for meat lovers.
Medieval Beef and Bacon Pie 470x352 The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones
Beef and bacon pie – with those two main ingredients, you can’t go wrong.

Pork Pie The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones
Pork pies seem to be comfort food.

Medieval Quail 470x626 The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones
Medieval Quail Drowned in Butter. I’ve never tried quail, but anything drowned in butter is good in my book!

I don’t know about you, but those photos are making me hungry. Now if someone would do something similar for food from Wheel of Time. Does anyone want to do this with me?

4 thoughts on “The Inn at the Crossroads: Real Food from Game of Thrones

  1. Great Post Thanks so much for the shout-out! We’re delighted that the foods of Westeros are getting some love across the web, and hope to bring even more dishes to life in the coming months!

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