A First-Timer’s Impression Of San Diego Comic Con

Comic Con logo 470x578 A First Timer’s Impression Of San Diego Comic Con

Now that the San Diego Comic Con is over and the dust has settled, the internet is abound with autopsies into the event. There was NO massive comics news announced, which puts the truth to my previous musings as to just what the major companies could possibly have left to announce regarding their future plans.

Cue the cries that it is just not about comics any more.

Wandering around starry-eyed with the religious zealotry of a first pilgrimage, I can call the lie to that statement. There were comics everywhere, in every form, and every single related piece of merchandise you can imagine. There is no shortage of what the SDCC is really about on offer.

I did wonder just what shows like Dexter or Breaking Bad were doing there however. Yes, I know Breaking Bad has had a long relationship with the Con, but where are the aliens? The super-powers or spandex? Demons? Monsters?

(Okay, with Dexter there is at least one if not more monsters, but that only reinforces my point.)

Yet the continuing relationship between the major studios and the Convention, unlike any of the other cons across the world is what gives SDCC its special magic. The purist in me is appalled, but the fanboy? The fanboy loves it.

So, let’s look at the practicalities. As a newbie, the first two days were fantastic. That is up until about four o’clock on the Friday when the Exhibition Room became so crowded, I could not move in any direction with my bag hitting someone.

In an event as well attended as this, it is understandable, but I fully comprehend the concerns that the Con has outgrown San Diego Convention Centre.

Saturday and Sunday were even worse, especially when there were special signings, such as an appearance by Stan Lee at one of the stalls. Queues built up in areas of the room that previously had been central thoroughfares. Would it have been too much for the organisers to arrange that these lines ran around the outskirts of the room rather than smack bang in the middle?

On that note, if there is something being put on to see, as a fan, I would like a moment to actually look at the thing to be looked at, and not be moved along by security. Some things take more than a millisecond to be appreciated. (I know this situation has made me sound like the latest incarnation of the Krang, but I felt rather inhuman and mechanical by this point of the day.)

While on the topic of security, which I believe was a lot calmer than previous years by all accounts; JUST HOW MANY TIMES does my badge need to be checked? At the door to the building, then twenty feet later at the door to the exhibition hall. Or at the bottom of the stairs, the top of the stairs, the entrance to the corridor leading to the panels and successive intervals thereafter. What was I going to do? Sneak in through the ventilation system?

The second screen rooms for popular panels were a great idea – can we see more of them? Maybe simulcast at the nearby café’s and hotels, so that the local businesses can share the joy?

And we all love our swag and our exclusives. So when I heard of exhibitors buying exclusives from other exhibitors only to bump the price way up, something tells me that is not right. It may be capitalism, but it sure ain’t looking after your fans or your customers.

When Chuck Rozanski told Newsarama that the event should be eleven days long (with Tuesday off in the middle), you know, I am tempted to agree with him. I’m not sure I could take all eleven days, but that merely opens the Convention up to even more fans. After all, despite the thousands that enjoyed the event, there were many thousands more that wanted the chance to go. Why not make space for them?


About Darren Burr

A devoted follower of the comics industry and their characters since a child, Darren now plays in many media but always returns to characters in skin-tight costumes beating each other up on the page. Radio host, blogger, fanfic author and producer of You Tube content, Darren idles away his days until his digital conquest of the world is complete.

Comments

  1. On that note, if there is something being put on to see, as a fan, I would like a moment to actually look at the thing to be looked at, and not be moved along by security. Some things take more than a millisecond to be appreciated. (I know this situation has made me sound like the latest incarnation of the Krang, but I felt rather inhuman and mechanical by this point of the day.)

    As a first timer to the con, I also felt frustrated that I was always being asked to move along from looking at a something interesting. It’s almost as if they don’t want us to LOOK at anything. Like when Marvel had stuff going on at their stage. I wanted to see what it was but I was told that I couldn’t stop to look. Even the Walking Dead booth had zombies milling about that made you want to look at them BUT, as soon as you stopped to look, some big guy in a blue shirt would say “Move along sir.” We can’t take in the sights?

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