The Most Difficult Words in the English Dictionary

By Bea

Did you know that the English language is the most spoken language in the world? Of course this includes both native and non-native speakers, but still. That’s around 1.35 billion people! Now, English may be the most spoken language, but can you say that you know it well enough? If you’re a dictionary geek, this article is for you! Check this out for some of the most difficult words in the English dictionary.

Abnegation

noun

If you’re a Divergent fan, then you might already have an inkling of what this word means. It means to deny oneself or to reject, surrender, or renounce certain rights, conveniences, responsibilities, or luxuries.

“Snape’s abnegation of his loyalty towards the Death Eaters proved his love for Lily.”

Anachronistic

adjective

This word is often used to describe something that seems to belong to another (often earlier) period. It can also be used to mean antiquated, outdated, old-fashioned.

“Ron’s dress robes at the Yule ball were so anachronistic! Good thing he’s got a sense of humor!”

Bane

noun

Bane basically pertains to a cause of great distress, misery, or annoyance. I’m sure we’ve all had this.

“Those filthy mudbloods are the bane of Voldemort’s existence.”

Consternation

noun

This word pertains to feelings of anxiety or dismay, typically at something unexpected. It can also mean bewilderment, terror, alarm, fear, panic, or horror.

“Victor Krum always had a crush on Hermione, much to the obvious consternation of Ron.”

Chauvinist

adjective

This means showing or relating to excessive or prejudiced loyalty or support for a particular group, sex, or cause.

“Can you believe Draco’s chauvinist attitude towards those Hufflepuffs? He’s such a Slytherin!”

Dubious

adjective

This could mean hesitant, doubtful, or suspicious.

“Harry didn’t even notice Professor Quirrell’s dubious actions.”

Exigent

adjective

This one refers to matters that are pressing or demanding.

“Hermione could not handle the pressing demands of all her schoolwork, so she resorted to using a time-turner.”

Foment

verb

To foment means to instigate or stir up an undesirable event.

“Ginny Weasley knew exactly how to foment an argument among her brothers.”

Garrulous

adjective

Garrulous means being excessively, pointlessly, or annoyingly talkative.

“Umbridge is a garrulous, old woman. She just went on and on about the new educational decree.”

Harangue

noun

A harangue is a lengthy, intense speech or verbal attack. Think of it as getting a pretty intense sermon from your mom after causing some trouble.

“Mrs. Weasley gave her boys a ten minute harangue after catching them in a squabble.”

Inchoate

adjective

This one means something that has just begun and so not fully formed or developed; rudimentary.

“You can’t blame the first years for having inchoate knowledge of magic.”

Jocose

adjective

Jocose, or should I say joke-ose (okay that was bad), is used to describe something playful or humorous.

“Weasley’s Wizard Wheezes is the place to go if you’re up for some jocose!”

Kismet

adjective

Kismet is a pretty cute word meaning fate or destiny.

“Ron and Hermione were made for each other. It’s totally kismet.”

Lackadaisical

adjective

This one’s like a more complex and funny way of describing something that is lacking in enthusiasm and determination. In short, it’s something that’s just carelessly lazy.

“Ron was lackadaisical after throwing up those slugs!”

Nonplussed

adjective

Have you ever felt so surprised and confused that were unsure of how to react? This word’s for you!

“Malfoy was nonplussed when Hermione’s fist suddenly met his face.”

Querulous

adjective

If you’re one to complain *annoyingly* like in a whining, petulant manner, then this word captures that.

“Moaning Myrtle became querulous when a bunch of students played a prank on her.”

Recreant

noun

A recreant refers to a coward or someone who is unfaithful to a belief.

“Do not trust a recreant like Peter Pettigrew.”

Sesquipedalian

noun

If you love conversing with lots of words, you might be a sesquipedalian.

“Just because you’re a Ravenclaw, doesn’t mean you have to be such a sesquipedalian. It doesn’t make you sound any smarter.”

Tintinnabulation

noun

This one refers to the lingering, tinkling sound of a ringing bell.

“The fans were cheering so loudly at the Quidditch game. I still feel a tintinnabulation in my ears!”

Undulate

verb

To undulate means to form or move in waves.

“The girls from the Beauxbatons Academy of Magic undulated as they moved in unison to the music.”

Vagary

noun

This is an unexpected and inexplicable change in a situation or in someone’s behavior.

“Under the imperius curse, Neville was able to a series of astonishing gymnastics.”

Yahoo

noun

I was surprised to learn that Yahoo is actually in the dictionary, and it’s not the Yahoo we know. It actually refers to a rude, noisy, or violent person.

“Slytherins are such yahoos. They can’t stop making fun of other people.”

Zenith

noun

This words refer to the time at which something is most powerful or successful.

“This year marks the zenith of Dumbledore’s leadership.”

20 Words to Know to Win Every Game of Scrabble

40 Interesting Geeky Quotes And Sayings

Have something to tell us about this article?
Let us know

or Comment Below

Gaming Trailers

Got a tip?

Let us know